TRIECA 2020 WEBINAR SERIES

The following presentations are being offered as part of the TRIECA 2020 Webinar Series, presented by Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA), in partnership with the Canadian Chapter of the International Erosion Control Association (CAN-IECA).  

Each webinar qualifies for 0.75 continuing development hour (CDHs) for the Certified Inspector of Sediment and Erosion Control (CISEC) program.

Registration options include:

  • Register for “Entire” TRIECA 2020 Webinar Series  – Click Here! 
  • Register for individual webinars only – Click Here to view the STEP Events & Training Calendar
  • To register for multiple webinars, or to add e-learning and/or in-class training events to your purchase click on the “+ Add to Booking” button during checkout.

Recordings will be made available to all those who have purchased an individual webinar or entire series if unable to view at time of LIVE webinar.  For additional information, please contact Victoria Kring at Victoria.Kring@trca.ca.


DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE LIST OF WEBINARS


Presentation Schedule:  April  – December 2020

Please note that webinars and guest speakers may be subject to change.

 

April 23, 2020 – MECP’s New On-Site and Excess Soil Management Regulation

Presenter: Laura Blease, Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks

Overview:
 This webinar will highlight Ontario’s new regulatory changes that will make it safer and easier for more excess soil to be reused locally.

Laura Blease is a Senior Policy Advisor with the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP). During her time at MECP, Laura has worked on multiple pieces of legislation, regulation, and policy, including the Great Lakes Protection Act, the Lake Simcoe Protection Act, the Water Opportunities Act, and the Canada-Ontario Great Lakes Agreement.  Laura also has significant experience in policy areas such as aggregates, lead in drinking water, and wastewater discharges, and has worked extensively in collaboration with Indigenous communities and organizations on policy development.  Laura currently plays a leadership role in the delivery of Ontario’s new excess soil regulation.

Abstract:

Ontario has finalized and is beginning to implement new regulatory changes that will make it safer and easier for more excess soil to be reused locally, while ensuring human health and the environment are protected.  This presentation will provide an overview of O. Reg. 406/19 – the new On-Site and Excess Soil Management Regulation, including key implementation dates.  This regulation also provides a framework for the reuse, where appropriate, of liquid soils — including the reuse of stormwater pond sediments.

Learning Objectives:

  • Gain a basic understanding of O. Reg. 406/19 – the new On-Site and Excess Soil Management Regulation
  • Understand the opportunities for innovation in local beneficial reuse of the stormwater pond sediment that is suitable for reuse under O. Reg. 406/19
  • Learn about the importance of early planning in the reuse of stormwater management pond sediments.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


April 30, 2020 New Success Stories on Stormwater Management Pond Sediment Reuse Approvals

Presenters: Francine Kelly-Hooper, Stantec Consulting Ltd. and Aroni McCutcheon, Ontario Ministry of Transportation

Overview: This webinar will discuss how to obtain MECP approval for stormwater management (SWM) pond sediment reuse under the new ‘Excess Soil regulation’ and how changes in urban land use practices could increase SWM pond sediment reuse opportunities as cost effective and sustainable alternatives to landfill disposal.

Francine Kelly-Hooper is Contaminant Scientist at Stantec. She has more than 20 years of experience in the government and private consulting sectors.  Francine operated her own research-based consulting firm, Kelly Hooper Environmental, for 16 years before joining CH2M HILL in 2014. Francine completed her PhD at the University of Waterloo in 2013, where she developed a new method for identifying petroleum hydrocarbon sources in soils and sediments. Over the past 18 years, she has compiled sediment chemistry profiles for over 100 SWM ponds.  Francine and her team continue to work with municipalities and governments on the development of a new approach to SWM sediment beneficial use evaluations.

Aroni McCutcheon, P. Eng. is a Contaminant and Waste Management Specialist with the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO). Aroni has a decade of professional experience managing property contamination, excess materials and spills for the Provincial Highways Management construction program and maintenance operations, as well as work experience with programs, policy and stakeholder relationships for the Environmental Policy Office. Prior to joining the MTO, she worked in private consulting in the areas of contaminated lands assessment and remediation, environmental due diligence, landfill management, and health and safety management and compliance at various industrial, commercial and institutional sites throughout Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, and the U.S.

Abstract:

Part 1: Understanding How Urban Versus Highway Land Use Practices Influence SWM Pond Sediment Contamination Levels and Reuse Considerations

An ongoing 15-year study of over 200 Ontario urban stormwater management (SWM) ponds has found that over 60% of sediments exceeded the Table 3 standards for polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

Coal tar sealants (CTS) used to blacktop driveways and parking lots is an important PAH source. SWM pond sediments and highway sweepings collected from the HWY 401 ETR quantify PAHs in CTS-free materials. PAHs were non-detectable in most samples, with no soil standard exceedances at all.

The weight-of evidence indicates that eliminating CTS from urban environments could increase SWM pond sediment reuse opportunities.

Part 2: SWM Pond Sediment Reuse Case Studies and Lessons Learned

  1. Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (MTO) SWM Pond Sediment Reuse:
    The MTO received the first waste management ECA to transport 15,000 m3 of undewatered Mississauga sediment to build berms on Hwy 401 and 403 land. Tipping fee savings of $3.3 million.
  2. City of Kitchener SWM Pond Sediment Reuse:
    Although MECP approved the reuse of sediment that did not exceed Table 2 standards, reuse was blocked by local jurisdictional issues. The alternative will use the sediment to build berms on Kitchener industrial roadsides.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how to obtain MECP approval for SWM pond sediment reuse under the new Excess Soil Regulation.
  • Understand the practical and regulatory approval process for transporting and applying undewatered sediment to recipient sites.
  • Understand how changes in urban land use practices could increase SWM pond sediment reuse opportunities as cost effective and sustainable alternatives to landfill disposal

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


May 7, 2020 Application of Geotextiles in Civil Engineering

Presenter: Isabel Perez, Terrafix Geosynthetics Inc.

Overview:
 This webinar will provide a review of the four basic functions of geotextiles and the corresponding design criteria that are most critical to consider for those specific applications.

Isabel Perez is a Product Manager of Subgrade Improvement at Terrafix Geosynthetics. This role gives her the opportunity to be involved in the design stage up to project completion. Her contributions include delivering value engineering designs, addressing site challenges, and providing technical assistance, tests, and site visits. Isabel graduated from URBE University in Venezuela in 2006 as an industrial engineer, and has worked for more than 10 years in civil engineering, supporting a wide variety of infrastructure projects in Venezuela, Spain, and Canada.

Abstract:

Geotextiles are one of the most versatile geosynthetic in civil engineering applications. They are used to reinforce vertical and steep banks of soil, ground applications such as temporary and permanent roads and highways, ground drains, filter, and erosion prevention applications. This presentation will provide a review of the four basic functions of geotextiles and the corresponding design criteria that are most critical to consider for those specific applications. In addition, a discussion of the various classes of projects that will benefit from use of geotextiles will be included. A sample of local case studies utilizing diverse applications will be presented to demonstrate the most commonly used and recommended practices.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about function, application, and design criteria for geotextiles.
  • Understand the benefits of using geotextiles in civil engineering applications.
  • Learn about best practices and local case study projects.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


May 14, 2020 Measuring Turbidity in Support of Erosion and Sediment Control Monitoring: When, Where, How, and Why?

Presenters:
Paul Villard and and Patrick Padovan, Geo Morphix Ltd.

Overview: This webinar will highlight examples of monitoring protocols taken from active construction sites and permanent stormwater facilities to showcase how the monitoring strategy can inform or bias our observations and interpretation of results.

Paul Villard is Director of Geo Morphix Ltd. He has been involved in research and consulting related to geomorphology for more than 25 years. Paul’s academic and applied interests include sedimentology, channel evolution, turbulence and hydrodynamics, field measurement techniques, urban impacts on rivers, and benefits of restored river systems. Paul is a member in good standing of Professional Geoscientists Ontario, Society of Ecological Restoration, and ECO Canada.

Patrick Padovan is a River Scientist and Project Lead at GEO Morphix Ltd. He manages hydrometric, water quality, and geomorphological monitoring projects.  Patrick has extensive experience preparing and executing pre-construction baseline monitoring and post-construction compliance and effectiveness monitoring programs. He combines his knowledge of earth surface processes and environmental legislation to support the development of stormwater management monitoring plans, subwatershed studies, and environmental impact studies.  Patrick has completed projects in numerous watersheds and Conservation Authority jurisdictions in Ontario.

Abstract:

Monitoring of turbidity or Total Suspended Solids (TSS) is an integral part of effective erosion control. Turbidity or TSS monitoring can aid in identifying and quantifying potential inputs of construction related sediments to inform and ultimately limit construction related sediment from entering receiving waterbodies.

In many jurisdictions, monitoring requirements such as intensity of monitoring, timing, general location, and triggers/targets are dictated through guidelines and permitting. Unfortunately, many sites are unique with regards to:

  • Connectivity to receiving waterbodies
  • Number of potential point sources
  • Types of sediments activated
  • Sensitivity of receivers

This becomes more complicated when placed in the context of potential sources other than the construction activities being monitored.  In this presentation, examples of monitoring protocols are taken from both active construction sites and permanent stormwater facilities to highlight how the monitoring strategy — including timing, targets and even sampling collection/measurement protocols — can inform or bias our observations and interpretation of results.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand sediment sources and transport mechanics and how this impacts monitoring results.
  • Understand that the proposed monitoring strategy can bias your measurements and ultimately the interpretation of the results.
  • Understand that sampling protocols need to be based on the physical processes we are trying to characterize and that the design — whether temporary erosion and sediment controls, or long-term ponds — have assumptions that need to be considered in monitoring.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


May 21, 2020 The Latest on ESC Standards and Related Research

Presenter:
Brian Zupancic, Canadian Standards Association

Overview: This webinar will introduce the soon-to-be published ESC Installation and Maintenance standard, which is the follow up standard to CSA/W202-18, ESC Inspection and Monitoring.

Brian Zupancic is a Senior Project Manager with CSA Group. Brian focuses on developing water resource standards in Canada, and also works on international standards in the mining and carbon sequestration sectors. He is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and holds a Master’s in Environmental Science and Policy from Johns Hopkins University.

Abstract:

This presentation will introduce the soon-to-be published Erosion and Sediment Control Installation and Maintenance standard, which is the follow up standard to CSA/W202-18, Erosion and Sediment Control Inspection and Monitoring. Participants will get a refresher on W202 and will also learn about a new research report that seeks to provide the ESC industry with insights into the successes and challenges associated with continuous turbidity monitoring efforts across Canada. Through a series of case studies, the report highlights the different ESC approaches used at various sites across Canada, and how those approaches have impacted monitoring results.

There are new and existing standards for use by the Canadian erosion and sediment control industry, as well as research developed to further inform the ESC industry on turbidity monitoring. The continued development of these standards, as well as the investment being made in supporting research, provides an excellent opportunity for ESC practitioners in Ontario and across Canada to learn about these efforts and ask questions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about a new standard dealing with harmonized requirements for installing and maintaining ESC measures.
  • Understand the requirements and recommendations outlined in CSA/W202, Erosion and Sediment Control Inspection and Monitoring and review the intended application and functionality of the standard.
  • Learn about a new research project that explores different experiences with turbidity monitoring conducted at projects across Canada.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


May 28, 2020 MECP’s Stormwater Consolidated Permissions Framework

Presenter:
Aziz Ahmed, Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP)

Overview: This webinar will address the benefits of the new ECA framework that will provide flexibility to the modification and installation of stormwater infrastructure in your area.

Aziz Ahmed P.Eng., is Manager of Approvals and Licensing at the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP), and is the approving director under Part V and VI of the Safe Drinking Water Act, and Part II.1 of the Environmental Protection Act. A graduate of the University of Toronto in Chemical Engineering, Aziz has worked with the MECP since 1988 in a variety of engineering and managerial positions, in the areas of water, wastewater, and stormwater management.

Abstract:

The Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP) has been working with a wide-ranging stakeholder working group composed of municipalities, Conservation Authorities, associations, and consultants to develop a consolidated permissions program. The intent of the consolidated permission is to include a municipality’s entire stormwater management system in a single Environmental Compliance Approval (ECA). These new ECAs will include up-to-date environmental protection conditions for monitoring, reporting, and maintenance, as well as pre-authorizing stormwater management systems installed by property developers under the new R208/19, and many modifications to existing municipal works. Learn how you can benefit from this new ECA framework that will provide flexibility to the modification and installation of stormwater infrastructure in your area.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how the new Regulation 208/19 (ECA in respect of Sewage Works) will provide flexibility to property developers installing stormwater management works within municipal boundaries.
  • Learn how municipalities can obtain a consolidated permission that includes all of their stormwater infrastructure in a single ECA, and what the benefits are.
  • Learn what terms and conditions will be in the new consolidated ECA that will provide for protection of our lakes, rivers, and streams.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


June 4, 2020 A Method to Analyze Stormwater Controls and Meet MECP Criteria for New Development

Presenter:
Edward Graham, Civica Infrastructure

Overview: This webinar will provide a case study of a municipality undergoing a Comprehensive Stormwater Management Master Plan (CSWM-MP).

Edward Graham is President of Civica Infrastructure. Edward has more than 25 years of consulting engineering experience and project delivery in Canada. He specializes in water resources related to municipal drainage, watershed hydrology and hydraulics, and environmental engineering services. Edward has developed long‐term programs for large scale sanitary infrastructure assessments and reductions of extraneous flows in York Region, as well as City of Toronto’s Basement Flooding Environmental Assessment (EA) studies. He has also designed and developed municipal software packages, including Visual OTTHYMO, WABAS (Water Balance Assessment System), SWMSoft (System-Wide Maintenance Software) and DataCurrent (Municipal Data Acquisition and Management). Edward has been a Senior Project Manager and Senior Engineer on numerous projects involving sanitary, storm and water system infrastructure, rainfall and drainage monitoring and analysis, and environmental assessments. He has led infrastructure condition assessment and capacity studies for growth planning, flood remediation, flood mapping, flood emergency response and sanitary I/I reduction.

Abstract:

The Ministry of Environment, Conservation, and Parks (MECP) will be issuing updated stormwater management criteria for the following:

  • Water balance
  • Water quality
  • Erosion control
  • Water quantity
  • Flood control

This presentation will provide a case study of a municipality undergoing a Comprehensive Stormwater Management Master Plan (CSWM-MP). The case study will isolate one study area of the municipality that is intended for future development.  A Visual OTTHYMO 6.0 hydrologic model will be presented to analyze the existing and future conditions of the study area. The model development and results will be showcased throughout the presentation.  Management of the MECP criteria will be achieved by providing stormwater controls for targets established in the post-development conditions model (i.e. Low Impact Development, retrofit opportunities, etc.).

Learning Objectives:

  • How to incorporate the new draft MECP guidelines into stormwater management projects
  • How to develop the hydrologic model
  • How to interpret targets related to water balance, water quality, erosion control, water quantity, and flood control

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


June 11, 2020 Subwatershed-Wide Environmental Compliance Approval (ECA) Pilot Project for Stormwater Infrastructure

Presenter:
Shawna Chambers, City of London

Overview: This webinar will focus on how establishing a subwatershed-scale stormwater ECA will enhance transparency, collaboration, and adaptive management of the receiving system among all parties.

Shawna Chambers P.Eng., DPA is the Division Manager of Stormwater Engineering for the City of London. Shawna holds a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Waterloo. Her focus is to deliver practical and effective stormwater programs to benefit both the natural environment and the greater community. Shawna is committed to sustainability, innovation, and challenging the way “it’s always been done”.

Abstract:

The Dingman Creek Subwatershed (DCS) in London, Ontario will face significant development pressures in the next 20 years. The original stormwater management (SWM) servicing strategy recommended 12 new traditional SWM wet ponds. The City of London initiated the DCS Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (EA) process to re-evaluate SWM through incorporating Low Impact Development. As part of the EA study, the municipality worked with the MECP to create a single subwatershed-wide stormwater Environmental Compliance Approval (ECA) for existing and preapproved stormwater works. The ECA is built upon an adaptive framework to create a more resilient system.

The approval, combined with data analytics (via subwatershed monitoring), facilitates improved long-term performance of the stormwater system to address watershed needs, supports measures to adapt to a changing climate, and assists the City in leveraging limited resources more efficiently. The project supports existing legislation and evolving policies from the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP) and other ministries that protect the environment while reducing the burden by issuing a single ECA.

A key component to the ECA has been the development of ‘live’ data sharing between the City and its partners at the Upper Thames River Conservation Authority (UTRCA) and MECP. This presentation will focus on how establishing a subwatershed-scale stormwater ECA will enhance transparency, collaboration, and adaptive management of the receiving system among all parties.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how components of a comprehensive Environmental Compliance Approval can provide accountability for municipalities while recognizing the need for flexibility when managing natural water resources systems.
  • Learn about the relationship between Municipalities and Conservation Authorities in the role of planning, constructing, and maintaining stormwater infrastructure and how we can find efficiencies to work together towards mutual goals.
  • Learn how municipalities can implement an adaptive management approach to stormwater infrastructure planning, implementation, and maintenance.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


June 18, 2020 Ground Source Cooling of Stormwater Pond Outflows: New Research on a Cost and Space Efficient Method to Mitigate the Thermal Impacts of Stormwater Ponds on Aquatic Life

Presenter:
Tim Van Seters, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA)

Overview: This webinar will review performance results from over 45 thermal mitigation projects in Ontario and presents data on two new techniques recently installed and monitored in Brampton, Ontario.

Tim Van Seters is Manager of the Sustainable Technologies Evaluation Program (STEP) at Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA). Tim has more than 19 years of experience designing and implementing field monitoring studies of stormwater management technologies and developing best practice guidance documents on the design, implementation, operation, and maintenance of stormwater practices. Throughout his career, Tim has presented widely on urban runoff management. and published several reports and papers on urban systems hydrology, watershed water quality, stormwater pond thermal mitigation, and low impact development stormwater management.
Tim holds a Master’s degree specializing in water resources from the University of Waterloo and a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Toronto.

Abstract:

Water temperature is a critical component of stream health, as it regulates both biotic and abiotic processes in streams. It can be both the driving and constraining factor for the survival of aquatic organisms. When runoff is drained through stormwater wet ponds, solar radiation heats the open pond water, resulting in thermally enriched outflows that exceed tolerance thresholds of aquatic organisms adapted to cooler water. Several measures have been devised to help mitigate temperatures and thermal loads from stormwater ponds. These include:

  • Subsurface draw outlets
  • Cooling trenches
  • Night-time release outlets
  • Low impact development techniques

This presentation reviews performance results from over 45 thermal mitigation projects in Ontario and presents data on two new techniques recently installed and monitored in the City of Brampton.  One of these helps cool pond outflows through borehole geo-exchange, while the other utilizes a surface cover to prevent solar heating of pond water.  The relative advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches are discussed, and recommendations are provided on the design and application of the measures under different site conditions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the problem of stormwater thermal enrichment in streams and the various mitigation measures that have been implemented in northern climates.
  • Understand how the mitigation measures implemented in Ontario have performed, and how these should be designed to optimize effectiveness.
  • Learn about the application and effectiveness of two new thermal mitigation measures piloted in the City of Brampton in 2018, and how these may be utilized to mitigate thermal impacts from stormwater ponds.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


June 25, 2020 Where Did All the Concrete Go?

Presenters: 
Michelle Letourneau and HT Lam, Savanta

Overview: This webinar will highlight lessons learned from landscape planting to reduce erosion and limit sediment transportation.

Michelle Letourneau is Senior Aquatic Ecologist with Savanta. Michelle is a seasoned aquatic ecologist and CISEC certified inspector who draws on her wide range of experience to evaluate the ecological aspects of proposed development/infrastructure and to indicate measures to limit the impact of the proposed work on aquatic features. Michelle provides proponents with clear summaries of how their business interacts with the natural world and provides direction regarding environmental resources.

HT Lam is Senior Landscape Architect with Savanta. HT is a humble professional who enjoys the field of landscape architecture/urban sesign and sees the physical environment as a canvas. Reforestation and restoration of this “canvas” due to urban development and intensification are key priorities to renew, protect and prolong human and living sustainable environments. HT is a practicing member of the Ontario Association of Landscape Architects.

Abstract:

Pouring a concrete channel is quick, and arguably results in a “neat” watercourse. But with the days of the concrete channel gone and its replacement, the natural channel, maturing, the fast and effective establishment of natural vegetation to achieve stabilization has become an essential art. It starts with a technical drawing, which is then implemented as natural and enduring sediment and erosion control, with its primary functions as stormwater collection, filtration, and conveyance, around and away from built assets, while recharging aquifers and supporting flora and fauna life. Case studies will be used to highlight lessons learned from landscape planting to reduce erosion and limit sediment transportation: effective mobilization, cover crop timing windows, and strategic use of other stabilization measures. Establishing vegetation communities consistently under variable conditions takes skilled restoration teams, attention to detail, and humility to whims of the weather.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to translate landscape drawings from paper into plants in the ground, including a discussion of timing, preparation, and maintenance.
  • Provide insight into key timing windows to achieve stabilization with seed application and reach the 80% cover goal.
  • Understand the key difference in planting strategies for natural channels versus shorelines.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


July 9, 2020 Five Fundamentals for Successful Stabilization and Revegetation of Disturbed Land Sites – Recent Case Studies

Presenter: 
Derek Oosterhouse, Profile Products LLC

Overview: This webinar will highlight innovative technologies available to effectively address unique project variables dealing with challenging soils and various erosion risks.

Derek Oosterhouse is International Regional Manager for Profile Products LLC. Derek first became involved with erosion control projects from an installation and contractor’s perspective while working for a large landscaping firm in West Michigan. In 2010, he joined the Profile Products team, focused primarily in the Asia Pacific, Midwest U.S. and Eastern Canada regions. Derek has project and business management experience in more than 25 countries, covering a variety of challenges and unique opportunities.

Abstract:

Successful rehabilitation, reclamation, or closure of massive soil and vegetation disturbances from construction, development, mining, or other land disturbing activity requires a comprehensive and holistic approach. Those overseeing rehabilitation efforts should assimilate and stage several considerations into a working relationship that integrates five fundamentals for successful erosion control and revegetation of disturbed sites. Employing the discipline to work through the discovery sequence of the first three fundamentals — to analyze soils and substrates, pick the right plant materials for the site, and select the most cost-effective erosion and sediment control techniques — will undoubtedly lead a project in the right direction. These fundamentals must be followed by the development of clear and comprehensive construction plans and specifications to effectively communicate the project requirements to contractors and installers. Once construction commences, onsite oversight of acceptable installations must be conducted by qualified inspectors knowledgeable of the site conditions. Then, active rehabilitation sites must be regularly inspected and maintained after each significant precipitation or other potentially damaging event. Inspections should be conducted by qualified professionals whose expectations are consistent with the installer as well as the owner and regulatory entities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the holistic approach to prescribing erosion control and vegetation solutions for disturbed land sites.
  • Learn about innovative technologies available to effectively address unique project variables dealing with challenging soils and various erosion risks.
  • Hear about recent case studies in North America that have implemented the five fundamentals approach with sustainable results.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


July 16, 2020 An Integrated Geomorphic, Hydraulic, and Ecological Assessment of Dam Decommissioning Along the Thames River in London, Ontario, Canada

Presenters:
Amanda McKay, Matrix Solutions and Jillian Schmitter, Jacobs

Overview: This webinar will review the City of London’s Environmental Assessment to determine the feasibility of implementing various infrastructure projects in conjunction with others, such as potentially decommissioning Springbank Dam.

Amanda McKay is Water Resources Consulting Engineer with Matrix Solutions. Amanda has more than seven years of consulting experience including hydrologic studies, flood modelling, land development, and environmental monitoring. Her expertise lies in hydrologic and hydraulic (H/H) modelling using EPASWMM, PCSWMM (1D and 2D), HEC RAS (1D and 2D), XPSWMM, XPSTORM, RIVER 2D, and HSPF. She has built, calibrated, and assessed results from H/H models for areas across Canada, including rural and urban settings.

Jillian Schmitter is Water Resources Consulting Engineer at Jacobs. Jillian has 10 years of experience specializing in water resources management and stormwater management, including inflow and infiltration studies, mitigation programs, and surface water H/H modelling. Jillian has led environmental assessment (EA) activities on various master plans, Schedule B EAs, and subwatershed studies. She has recent experience leading and executing complex water resources EAs with high profile public consultation requirements through her experience on the One River Master Plan EA, Mud Creek Subwatershed Study, and Pollution Prevention Control Plan for the City of London.

Abstract:

The Thames River is one of the largest rivers in southern Ontario, and is an important natural, cultural and recreational feature that flows through the City of London.  In 2016, the City initiated an Environmental Assessment to determine the feasibility of implementing various infrastructure projects in conjuction with others, such as potentially decommissioning Springbank Dam.  Springbank Dam has been operating since 1870, providing consistently high water levels for a range of recreational uses. In 2008, one of the newly installed steel gates failed during testing, leaving the dam inoperable. The river has since been free-flowing, allowing more sediment transport and vegetation growth, creating a new upstream aquatic environment. The lower water levels have allowed more than 10 hectares of vegetation to inhabit the floodplain, strengthening the newly formed channel banks.  Study components included the assessment of hydraulics, geomorphology, ecology and fisheries. Field studies included bathymetric surveys, geomorphic assessments, channel substrate characterization, aquatic habitat mapping, fish population studies, and shoreline vegetation studies.  Desktop studies included two-dimensional hydraulic modelling, ecological constraints mapping, and channel morphology evolution mapping.  Hydraulic models were used to support the characterization of existing geomorphic conditions, assess erosion areas, define physical habitat, and assess flooding potential in public access areas.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how rivers naturally adjust to dam removal, specifically in urbanized environments.
  • Learn how to develop holistic approaches to stream restoration and natural channel design to balance recreational, economic, environmental, and infrastructure needs.
  • Understand how to use 1D and 2D hydraulic modelling to support erosion and sediment transport to predict channel evolution.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


July 23, 2020 The LID Life-Cycle Costing Tool: How it Works, How to Use It, and How to Contribute to its Accuracy

Presenters:
Kyle Vander Linden and Kyle Menken, Credit Valley Conservation (CVC)

Overview: This webinar will introduce participants to the Low Impact Development Life-Cycle Costing Tool (LID LCCT), an MS Excel based spreadsheet tool that allows users to generate cost estimates for several LID stormwater practices.

Kyle Vander Linden is a Program Manager with the Integrated Water Management team at CVC.  Based on lessons from the field over the last 11 years in LID implementation, he provides facilitation and guidance to municipalities on critical processes for LID/GI design, construction, assumption, operation and maintenance.  Kyle is a lead instructor for the Sustainable Technologies Evaluation Program’s (STEP) LID training program and continues to focus on ways to improve the business case for LID.Kyle Menken is a Technician with the Integrated Water Management team at CVC.  Kyle’s educational background is in philosophy, classical studies, and public relations. His current focus is writing, editing and developing guidance documents, studies, and reports with the aim of improving the business case for low impact development implementation on private property.

Abstract:

The LID Life-Cycle Costing Tool (LID LCCT) evaluates the life-cycle costs for LID BMPs (bioretention, enhanced grass swales, vegetated filter strips, green roofs, rainwater harvesting, infiltration chamber, and infiltration trenches).  Model designs are used for each BMP. The user inputs basic information (drainage area, native soil infiltration rate, and drainage period) on which type of BMP they want (e.g. for bioretention, whether it is a full or partial infiltration model). The tool uses these inputs to generate life-cycle costs.  Initially released in 2013, the updated version of the LID LCCT tool includes wet and dry ponds to facilitate comparisons between LID and more traditional methods. Unit costs have been updated with RS Means data and through consultation with suppliers.  It is also now fully open for users to modify back-end calculations and tool assumptions (e.g., inflation and discount rates).  Accurately estimating the life-cycle costs of LID BMPs is the first step in conducting a cost-benefit analysis for potential LID projects. However, costing of LID BMPs can be a time-consuming and costly process. The STEP LCCT helps users to streamline this process.  Initial sensitivity analyses show that the tool is reasonably accurate. The STEP team hopes to develop a costing database and to improve the tool by taking completed LID projects and inputting them into the tool.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn why accurate financial forecasting is critical for choosing between BMPs, choosing between LID and traditional dry and wet ponds, and conducting cost-benefit analyses.
  • Understand how the LCCT works: unit costs, model designs, pre-construction, construction, performance verification, maintenance, and rehabilitation.
  • Learn about the results of STEP’s initial sensitivity analyses and how users can adapt the tool for more accurate results.

Click here to register for this webinar only

 


July 30, 2020 The Onondaga County Save the Rain Program: 200 Completed Projects in 10 Years Lessons Learned and Success Stories

Presenters:
Zachary Monge, Jacobs and Adam Woodburn, Onondaga County Department of Water Environment Protection

Overview: This webinar will focus on the lessons learned and success stories from the construction of over 200 GI projects to date.

Zachary Monge is Program Manager with Jacobs in Syracuse, NY. An experienced green infrastructure (GI) stormwater technologist, he has designed over 55 distinct GI projects for stormwater management and CSO abatement.

Adam Woodburn is a Program Coordinator, Stormwater Management with the Onondaga County Department of Water Environment Protection. Adam is a registered landscape architect and certified arborist with 14 years of experience. His focus on stormwater management includes public outreach and education, stormwater and green infrastructure, program management, design construction inspection, and maintenance.

Abstract: Since January 1999, Onondaga County, New York has been complying with an Amended Consent Judgment (ACJ) which includes control of combined sewer overflows (CSO) to the tributaries of Onondaga Lake. In November 2009, the ACJ was again amended to incorporate green infrastructure (GI) strategies to further reduce wet weather from entering the combined sewer system (CSS). This is the first court order in the country to require the use of green infrastructure. The new program was entitled Save the Rain. Since 2009, Onondaga County has constructed over 200 projects on a fast track basis, including a wide range of GI technologies. These projects capture more than 130 million gallons of stormwater annually. This presentation will focus on the lessons learned and success stories from the construction of over 200 GI projects to date. Case studies from specific projects will be provided and the following key subject matters will be covered:

  • An overview of the Save the Rain projects constructed to date including the various GI technologies utilized (porous pavements, bioretention, green roofs, infiltration practices, enhanced tree planters, etc.)
  • Advantages and disadvantages of GI technologies and products from ten years of GI implementation and construction in various environments
  • Success stories from the construction of GI, from the standpoint of construction and long-term performance
  • Monitoring results of three distinct GI projects during several varying rainfall events.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the advantages and disadvantages of different GI technologies.
  • Understand what we have learned about construction methods and performance.
  • Find out what we have learned from monitoring over 10 years.

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August 13, 2020 Taking a Communal “One Water” Approach to Retrofitting Existing Commercial and Industrial Lands in the Southdown District of Mississauga: Addressing Stormwater, Water Conservation, and Infiltration and Inflow Challenges

Presenters:
Shannon Malloy and Asif Bhatti, Credit Valley Conservation (CVC)

Overview: This webinar will touch on the barriers that have prevented wide-scale uptake of low impact development (LID) of private property and focus on the technical aspects of the study and will explore the ‘one water’ approach that was used for defining existing conditions and developing conceptual designs.

Shannon Malloy is a Specialist with the Integrated Water Management team at CVC. Shannon began her career at CVC in 2013, monitoring low impact developments (LIDs) to identify construction deficiencies, verify system performance, and track maintenance needs. In her current role, she focuses on supporting LID implementation projects. Some of Shannon’s key responsibilities include examining the feasibility of communal, multi-property LID retrofits, as well as collaborating with municipal partners to develop inspection and maintenance standard operating procedures for LID assets..

Asif Bhatti is a Specialist with Integrated Water Management team at CVC. Asif is a licensed professional engineer in Ontario with more than 10 years of experience. He has extensive experience working in the public, private, and academic sectors within Canada and internationally. Asif’s expertise includes hydrological and hydraulic modeling, low impact development, climate change impact assessment, and integrated watershed planning and management. He has developed a distributed biosphere hydrological model to evaluate the impacts of climate change on the hydrological cycle in cold regions, semi-arid and poorly gauged river basins. Asif worked previously on the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) on the Asian Water Cycle Initiative project for the development of river management, data integration and analysis system.

Abstract:
This presentation will touch briefly on barriers that have prevented wide-scale uptake of low impact development of private property. CVC is studying an approach to overcoming challenges with LID implementation and will present on a Federation of Canadian Municipalities-funded initiative that evaluates the technical and financial feasibility of communal stormwater management systems on public and private property. This presentation will focus on the technical aspects of the study and will explore the ‘one water’ approach that was used for defining existing conditions and developing conceptual designs.

A 2D PC SWMM model of existing stormwater conditions was developed and forms the basis for modelling communal LID retrofit scenarios and future climate change scenarios. The model will be used to evaluate and optimize the performance of conceptual designs. Surveys and field investigations were conducted to determine the existing conditions for the water and wastewater systems.

The presentation will include information on why a “one water” perspective of existing conditions is important for developing integrated conceptual designs for stormwater management. Understanding how the water systems interact should be leveraged to optimize the performance of the communal stormwater design to also address water conservation opportunities and reduce inflow and infiltration to the sanitary sewer system.

The presentation will also cover how CVC’s existing condition findings are being interpreted to help build a communal solution and address the priorities of all three water systems.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discover the benefits of communal LID retrofits and how they can help overcome barriers to making green infrastructure mainstream.
  • Learn key steps in undertaking surveys to identify water conservation opportunities, as well as inflow and infiltration reduction opportunities on private property in industrial/commercial land uses.
  • Learn about design considerations and the importance of integrating water and wastewater systems in communal stormwater designs to achieve water conservation and inflow and infiltration reduction.

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August 20, 2020 Anionic PAM: Correct Usage and Application

Presenter: 
Seva Iwinski Bray, Applied Polymer Systems

Overview: This webinar will cover three major approaches to using polymer enhanced best management practices and will detail and illustrate the most common and effective polymer enhanced best management practices that have been quantified and proven effective.

Seva Iwinski Bray is Vice President/Environmental Scientist with Applied Polymer Systems. Seva is highly involved in technical training to educate companies, agency personnel, and firms that anticipate using or are interested in furthering their knowledge on polymer enhanced best management practices. Seva holds a BS in BioEnvironmental Science from Texas A&M University.

Abstract: Anionic polyacrylamides (PAMs) are a safe and effective method for erosion and sediment control as well as stormwater management. Using anionic PAM and PAM-based technologies in conjunction with traditional stormwater and erosion control BMPs can optimize their performance to meet discharge and turbidity goals. In turn, they greatly minimize the amount of sediment and other forms of turbidity leaving sites during and after land disturbing activities, as well as reduce turbidity and contaminant concentrations in receiving aquatic systems. This presentation will cover three major approaches to using polymer enhanced best management practices:

  • Prevent erosion and sedimentation by capturing or retaining the sediment before it can migrate off site.
  • Use polymer enhancement in conjunction with circulation/mixing systems, dewatering ditches, or other mixing devices to remove turbidity from contaminated waters.
  • Use polymer enhancement to remove unmanageable muck through de-mucking where sediment has been deposited or where sediment basin capacity is diminished.

Anionic PAMs have proven highly effective in erosion control and water treatment applications. Using polymer enhancement in conjunction with other BMPs can result in a more than 95% reduction in total suspended solids (TSS) and turbidity (NTUs).  This presentation will detail and illustrate the most common and effective polymer enhanced best management practices that have been quantified and proven effective.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand why anionic polyacrylamides (PAMs) are a safe and effective method for erosion and sediment control.
  • Learn how anionic polymers are used to enhance best management practices.
  • Learn about the correct application and setup of polymer enhanced best management practices.

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August 27, 2020 Down to Earth: Overcoming Obstacles Specifying and Approving Soils for Use within LID

Presenters:
Jen Young, Stantec and Jaime Douglass, Jenkins Soil Mixtures

Overview: This webinar will introduce current specifications and examine how a qualified landscape professional mixes and tests amended soils.

Jen Young is a Green Infrastructure Sector Leader, Community Development – Canada, with Stantec. Jen has nearly 15 years of consulting experience in water resources engineering, including low impact development, green infrastructure, integrated stormwater management plans, and construction inspection. She also has extensive experience in scoping, design, construction and inspection, and monitoring of LID facilities. Jen has completed many projects across Canada and has extensive knowledge of the challenges involved in LID design and construction.

Jaime Douglass is Director of Sales and Product Development forJenkins Soil Mixtures. Jaime specializes in engineering growing media for a variety of landscape and horticultural applications, with a focus on low impact development. He has provided specialty soils and advised on bio retention design compositions for pilot projects in association with various conservation authorities, and has volunteered as corporate partner on published studies investigating the performance of bio retention systems. Jaime also participated on the technical advisory committee for the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) that developed a National Standard for Bio Retention Facilities.

Abstract: What is amended soil? It is soil that has been engineered with selected components added to meet specific needs of low impact development (LID) facilities. The soils in these systems are responsible for slowing, treating and filtering the water from harmful metals, and nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen. However, current LID guidance provides specifications for amended soils that can be difficult to achieve. This presentation will introduce current specifications, and examine how a qualified landscape professional mixes and tests amended soils. We will also address the current challenges involved in meeting the specification, and explain how you can overcome them. This presentation will finish by exploring what parts of the specification and soil characteristics are most important for the function of the LID facility, and how to confidently accept and monitor installation of soils that may not always match specified values or parameters.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn what amended soils are and why they are important.
  • Understand how amended soils are specified, mixed and tested, and learn how to overcome the current challenges associated with creating amended soil to meet current specifications outlined in guidance documents.
  • Learn how to evaluate and monitor amended soils, including what parameters are most important and how to accept soils that may deviate from specifications.

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September 10, 2020 Effect of Soil Type and Static versus Dynamic Design Approaches on LID Facility Size and Cost

Presenters: 
Matthew Wilson, City of Kitchener and Josef Kardos, Jacobs

Overview: This webinar will examine the nonlinear relationship between LID sizing depth and average annual retention volume, and understand the effect of soil type on LID sizing depth and average annual retention volumes.

Matthew Wilson, M.Eng., P.Eng., is a Water Resources Engineer for City of Kitchener. Matthew’s career has focused on conventional stormwater management practices and green infrastructure approaches that attempt to mitigate urban-environmental issues. Matthew’s work experience includes hydrologic and hydraulic modelling, LID design and construction implementation, and City-wide stormwater monitoring programs.

Josef Kardos is a Water Resources Specialist at Jacobs. Previously, he was Water Resources Modeling Program Manager for the Philadelphia Water Department. He directed hydrologic and hydraulic models of the stormwater and wastewater collection systems, and managed the modelling, monitoring, and data analysis of Philadelphia’s innovative green infrastructure (GI) program. Since joining Jacobs, Josef has continued to work on GI projects in the U.S. and Ontario.

Abstract:
Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP) draft guidelines for low impact development (LID) help to inform the sizing of LID facilities that aim to control the runoff generated by the regionally-specific 90th percentile rainfall event. Municipalities that seek to implement LID are often faced with site constraints in which a portion of the drainage area cannot feasibly be managed by LID. In these cases, “overcontrol” of LID is often practiced to compensate for the unmanaged area. However, consistent methods for calculating the degree of LID overcontrol needed to meet stormwater water quality or retention criteria have not been practiced to date. This project examined a set of right-of-way LID projects in the City of Kitchener. By calculating the nonlinear relationship between LID sizing depth and average annual retention volume, we demonstrated that the overcontrol needed to achieve criteria is much greater than a simple 1:1 offset in LID treatment depth. We next examined the effect of soil type by comparing results from a static design-based spreadsheet calculator, and the LID Treatment Train Tool with a dynamic design approach. We found that the degree of overcontrol needed is strongly influenced by soil type, and the selection of either a static or dynamic design approach. This has important cost implications for right-sizing LID infrastructure based on soil type, and potential adjustments for I/P ratios for different LID and soil types.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the nonlinear relationship between LID sizing depth and average annual retention volume, and understand the effect of soil type on LID sizing depth and average annual retention volumes.
  • Understand the degree of overcontrol required when LID is only feasible to manage a portion of catchment area runoff, and learn how water quality treatment measures in series (i.e. LID and OGS) can be sized jointly to achieve stormwater criteria.
  • Learn about examples of recently developed City of Kitchener LID standard drawings used to provide examples of the LID integration into the municipality’s complete streets initiative (road cross sections including LID features).

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September 17, 2020 Performance of Mature Bioretention

Presenters:
Jennifer Drake and Sylvie Spraakman, University of Toronto

Overview: This webinar will highlight the findings of recent investigations into the performance of Ontario bioretention cells and the maintenance practices that were implemented in various locations

Dr. Jennifer Drake is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Mineral Engineering at the University of Toronto and cross-appointed with the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design. Her research group specializes in green infrastructure, low impact development, and stormwater management. She is the recipient of Engineers Canada’s 2019 Young Engineer Achievement Award.

Sylvie Spraakman is a professional engineer and PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto. Her thesis will cover the following studies on bioretention: a scoping literature review, evapotranspiration and the water balance, and mature hydrologic performance. Sylvie has previously worked in engineering consulting, providing stormwater management design and guidance. She continues to practice with her own firm, with the goal of improving the design of stormwater treatment facilities.

Abstract:

Bioretention systems are a common and popular form of green infrastructure across Ontario, but their long-term performance is poorly documented. In this presentation Professor Drake and PhD candidate Sylvie Spraakman will share the findings of recent investigations into the performance of Ontario bioretention cells. They will present the water quality and quantity data collected from a bioretention cell at Toronto and Region Conservation Authority’s (TRCA) Kortright Centre for Conservation. This cell was was monitored in 2013-2014 (immediately after construction) and in 2017-2018 (after maturity). They will also present the results of a comprehensive hydrologic performance survey of more than 20 mature bioretention cells in southern Ontario. The methodology developed for this survey, which allows practitioners to determine an individual cell’s performance, was intentionally designed to be flexible depending, on resources available. The results of both studies show that bioretention can perform well years later, even with little to no maintenance. Poor performance is attributed more to the selection of plants and materials during the design or construction phase. For example, selecting soils with high silt and clay content will lead to less water storage capacity and lower infiltration rates. In addition, changes to grading during construction can lead to different volumes of water being directed to the bioretention cell inlet or overflow. Finally, this presentation will discuss the maintenance practices that were implemented in various locations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about monitoring methodologies for bioretention to track performance metrics, which can also be applied to (low impact development (LID) practices more generally.
  • Understand the design practices of bioretention that lead to enhanced and maintained hydrologic and water quality performance over the long term.
  • Learn how to apply maintenance practices to bioretention and the effect of those maintenance practices on performance.

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September 24, 2020 Post Storm Monitoring: A Flood Risk Analysis Network (FRANk) Discussion

Presenters:
Matt Johnston and David Gingerich, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA)

Overview: This webinar will allow participants to understand how TRCA plans to utilize the latest technology to continue improving its erosion monitoring through 2020 and beyond.

Matt Johnston is Senior Manager, Erosion Risk Management with Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA). Matt and his team monitor the condition of TRCA’s erosion control structures and assess the risk of erosion hazards to property and infrastructure. In addition, Matt’s team is responsible for the project management and delivery of remedial works to address new hazards or replace failing structures, working closely with other TRCA Restoration and Infrastructure staff.

David Gingerich is an Environmental Technologist with the Erosion Studies and Analysis team at Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA). David brings his water resources engineering experience and knowledge to the risk assessment of erosion control structures and erosion hazard sites. He strives to provide the Erosion Risk Management group with a distilled source of information to facilitate the effective management and implementation of erosion control projects.

Abstract:

Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) owns and maintains a vast network of more than 1,100 permanent erosion control structures throughout the ravines and shorelines of our jurisdiction. TRCA’s Engineering Projects group is responsible for monitoring the condition of these structures, along with more than 2,400 other erosion hazard sites that threaten property and infrastructure. In order to deploy staff more efficiently and effectively, TRCA began developing its Flood Risk Analysis Network (FRANk) 2018, linking TRCA’s real-time stream and rain gauge network to inspection sites. A post storm analysis was performed for each event in 2018 that exceeded initial gauge thresholds, and staff were deployed to inspect priority sites in areas where the storm impacts were expected to be greatest. Through continual calibration, analysis, and refinements FRANk is now connected to multiple partner agency real time data networks, with the potential for future connection to Gauge Adjusted Radar Rainfall (GARR) networks. As part of modernizing TRCA’s erosion monitoring programs, we are also beginning to leverage the Remotely Piloted Aircraft System team (RPAS) to establish pre-programmed RPAS flights over high risk areas. These same paths can be flown post storm to better document the changes. Performing more focused inspections, targeted on impacted reaches, in a repeatable and efficient manner, will ensure that the future of TRCA’s erosion monitoring program is filled with promise.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about different types of monitoring for permanent erosion control infrastructure (scheduled versus post storm inspections) and erosion hazards.
  • Understand how TRCA’s Flood Risk Analysis Network (FRANk) was developed, and implemented, and is being continually improved to quantifiably help monitoring inspections become more efficient and effective in targeting areas most impacted by storm events.
  • Understand how TRCA plans to utilize the latest technology to continue improving our erosion monitoring through 2020 and beyond.

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October 1, 2020 Groundwater Sapping: An Under-appreciated Driver of Slope Instability with Important Implications for Erosion Control in the Valleys of Southern Ontario

Presenter:
Robin McKillop, Palmer

Overview: This webinar will focus on how to recognize groundwater sapping and the contribution it has to slope instability and erosion within the valleys of southern Ontario.

Robin McKillop is Principal Geomorphologist with Palmer. Robin has 17 years of experience developing innovative and practical strategies for addressing environmental challenges faced by municipalities, land developers, and resource industries across Canada. Robin’s focus on applications of fluvial geomorphology in southern Ontario has greatly benefited from his complementary expertise in hillslope processes and glacial landforms.

Abstract:

Groundwater sapping is responsible for slope instability and erosion over a range of spatial and temporal scales within the valleys of southern Ontario. Groundwater sapping is a geomorphological process through which sediments are eroded from a slope by near-constant groundwater discharge at a particular location. It produces distinct slope hollows to entire valleys, with amphitheater-like heads, steep side walls, and a flat floor. Newly available LiDAR-derived topographic data for portions of southern Ontario have catalyzed widespread recognition of slope instabilities attributable to groundwater sapping. An inventory of mass movements along Toronto’s Mud and Yellow Creek ravines revealed at least eight sites where groundwater sapping has formed retrogressive headscarps, some of which pose a risk to residences and infrastructure. Distinguishing slope instability driven by groundwater sapping from that driven by landsliding is critical to slope stability assessment. Standard geotechnical practices for predicting long-term stable slope morphology and erosion hazard limits fail to accurately represent conditions following continued groundwater sapping. An example is provided from the Patterson Creek valley, in Richmond Hill. Solutions aimed at mitigating instability and erosion driven by groundwater sapping must prioritize redirection of groundwater away from the sapping site (e.g. French drains) instead of, or in addition to, stabilization of present topography.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the contribution of groundwater sapping to slope instability and erosion within the valleys of southern Ontario.
  • Learn how to recognize groundwater sapping, based on field observation and interpretation of LiDAR-derived topographic data, by drawing attention to unique morphological features it produces.
  • Understand why long-term risks posed by groundwater sapping cannot be effectively assessed or mitigated based on standard geotechnical practices.

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October 8, 2020 The Ups and Downs of Using Wood in Stream Restoration

Presenter:
Brad Fairley, 5 Smooth Stones Restoration Inc.

Overview: This webinar will highlight the value of using wood in stream restoration projects and why regulators should encourage designers to include wood in more designs.

Brad Fairley is Director of 5 Smooth Stones Restoration Inc. Brad has more than 35 years of experience in water resources management, with the last 20 focused on stream restoration. He has completed more than 100 stream restoration projects across North America. During the last few years, Brad has focused on developing habitat banking as a funding mechanism for stream restoration. He is currently working with Aquatic Habitat Canada, which is advising Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) on regulations for the new Fisheries Act. Since starting his own company, Brad has been focused on improving the quality of stream restoration work.

Abstract: Many stream restoration projects successfully provide a stable channel. However, the restoration of biological function can be slow. Research has shown that a lack of carbon is responsible for the slow return of biological function. In response, designers have found ways to increase the amount of wood used in in-stream and bank protection structures.
Designers have figured out how to include wood in j-hooks, drop structures and constructed riffles. Bank protection structures that use wood tend to focus on protecting the toe with woody debris. The benefits of using wood include a faster restoration of biological function, excellent fish habitat, and very effective energy dissipation and bank protection. The drawbacks include getting the structures permitted by inexperienced regulators and getting the contractor to build them correctly. However, these drawbacks are diminishing with each completed project. Depending on the project and its location, the use of wooden structures can increase or decrease costs. Overall, the benefits far outweigh the drawbacks and all practitioners should be incorporating wood whenever possible.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how designers can include wood in their designs.
  • Understand the value of wood in stream restoration projects and why regulators should encourage designers to include wood in more designs.
  • Learn how the use of wooden structures is becoming more common and what contractors will need to do differently as a result.

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October 15, 2020 New Standards Help Build Resiliency Against Flooding

Presenters: 
Lynn Barber and Paul Steenhof, Canadian Standards Association

Overview: This webinar will highlight two new CSA publications recently published that will help build resiliency against flooding through flood resilient design of new residential communities and through the data on extreme precipitation events that aids that design.

Lynn Barber is a Project Manager with CSA Group. She manages several national and international technical committees responsible for the development of standards in natural resources, with a focus on the water sector. Lynn has 25 years of experience and holds a degree in geological engineering from Queen’s University and a Master of Science (Petroleum Geology) from the University of Calgary.

Paul Steenhof
is a Project Manager with CSA Group. He manages several national and international technical committees responsible for the development of standards in natural resources, with a focus on weather data and weather data analysis.Paul has 20 years of experience and holds a PhD (Geography) from Carleton University and a Master of Science (Geography) from the University of Toronto.

Abstract:
 Canadian communities are facing more and more challenges in protecting themselves against frequent and intense flooding events.  Now, more than ever, they need the tools to arm themselves against the impacts from flooding. Increasing resiliency to flooding will help communities return to normal functions more quickly after flooding events.  Two new CSA publications (one, a National Standard and one, guidance) were recently published to help municipalities build resiliency against flooding through flood resilient design of new residential communities and through the data on extreme precipitation events that aids that design.

  • CSA/W204 (released December 2019), Flood Resilient Design for New Residential Communities, provides requirements and recommendations at the broader community level and in greater detail, at the stormwater system level, with the ultimate objective to help protect against flood hazards.
  • CSA PLUS 4013 (2019) — TECHNICAL GUIDE: Development, interpretation, and use of rainfall intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) information: Guideline for Canadian water resources practitioners, has been designed for professionals with a role in the planning, design, management, inspection, and regulation of stormwater, drainage, wastewater, and flood management systems. The 2019 version of the guidance document has been updated with respect to how best to incorporate climate change into IDF information.

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop an understanding of the key elements of each standard and how they might benefit their community.
  • Learn how standards and guidance can help in building resilience against flooding.
  • Acquire an understanding of the complementary nature of the two standards and how they can build flood resilience.

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October 22, 2020 Green Infrastructure Standards Development and Soil Cell Evaluation

Presenters:
Kristina Hausmanis and Niloufar Mohajerani, City of Toronto

Overview: This webinar will provide an overview of the City of Toronto’s Green Streets program, the process that is underway for developing Green Infrastructure standards and why they are required.

Kristina Hausmanis is the Green Streets Project Manager for Transportation Services at the City of Toronto, where she coordinates the inter-divisional implementation of green infrastructure into right-of-way projects. Kristina has more than 12 years of experience developing and implementing municipal programs. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology from McGill University and a Master of Environmental Science from the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus.

Niloufar Mohajerani is Project Manager, Stormwater Management Infrastructure, at the City of Toronto. Niloufar holds a Bachelor of Science in chemical engineering and a Master of Science in environmental engineering. During her Masters studies, she developed a passion for the environment and sustainability, with a focus on water and wastewater treatment. Niloufar joined the City in 2013 and quickly rose through the ranks, spending two years in municipal construction inspection services and three years with Toronto Water Operations. She has fed her insatiable interest in sustainability by focusing on stormwater management for the past five years. Niloufar recently acquired her Professional Engineer (P.Eng.) designation in the province of Ontario and is looking forward to expanding her knowledge and experience in green infrastructure as well as low impact development features in the future.

Abstract:

The Green Streets program is a City of Toronto initiative to incorporate Green Infrastructure (GI) into the public right-of-way, implemented opportunistically through the Capital Works Program and Development/Growth related projects. As GI projects an increase in prevalence in and out of the City, one of the major milestones for the City is to develop GI standards and specifications to which both developers and City staff can adhere. The lack of GI standards is one of the biggest barriers to widespread incorporation of Green Streets and, once adopted, will facilitate implementation and simplify operation and maintenance procedures. The City currently has an RFP in procurement to achieve this goal. This presentation will provide an overview of the City’s Green Streets program, the process that is underway for developing GI standards and why they are required, and will focus on the demonstration project that is currently underway to evaluate various new soil cell technologies. Currently, the City does not have standards for soil cells in streetscape and storm-water management applications. Testing these products in real-life infrastructure projects can be too costly and disruptive. In order to assist in developing the desired standards, a controlled study that examines the advantages and disadvantages of the different soil cell designs in field applications of the technologies is being undertaken over the winter of 2019-2020

Learning Objectives:

  • Hear an overview of how the City of Toronto is developing GI standards to help streamline the process of review and implementation, and to help avoid common pitfalls.
  • Understand the impacts of soil cell variation in product design, complexity, constructability, and post-installation maintenance and access, particularly when underground utilities need repair.
  • Hear about Green Streets pilot projects implemented in the City of Toronto, their success and lessons learned.

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October 29, 2020 So, It Rained a Meter, Now What?

Presenter:
William Hunt, North Carolina State University

Overview: This webinar will highlight how designers/engineers are tasked with the impossible: preventing large scale flooding.

Dr. William Hunt is the William Neal Reynolds Distinguished University Professor and Extension Specialist in the Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC, USA. William has specialized in stormwater management (and now green infrastructure) since 1997. He conducts 20-25 workshops annually across North America and overseas. He and his team have 130 peer-refereed journal articles, and have monitored and/or designed more than 200 stormwater control measures. William is the proud mentor to 50 stormwater professionals who are alumni of his program.

Abstract:

Hurricane Florence dumped as much as one meter of water on parts of Southeastern North Carolina. This occurred only one year after massive flooding in Houston, Texas. Epic rainfall events, while still considered ‘”epic,” may no longer be infrequent. What does this mean for engineering design standards? What storms should we consider? Where is it OK to develop? What guidance does the engineering code of conduct provide insights to these questions and more are the focus of this presentation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how storms that once were considered “epic” now are occurring with somewhat regular frequency.
  • Discover how designers/engineers are tasked with the impossible: preventing large scale flooding.
  • Understand how moderately-sized events provide an opportunity for engineering innovation.

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November 5, 2020 Making Urban Landscapes more Absorbent to Stormwater Through Higher Standards for Planting Soil Depth and Quality

Presenter:
Dean Young, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA)

Overview: This webinar presents findings from a three-year field monitoring study comparing the run-off characteristics of simulated lawn test plots receiving roof drainage, located at the Kortright Centre in Vaughan, Ontario.

Dean Young is currently a Project Manager with the Sustainable Technologies Evaluation Program where his work focuses on evaluating the effectiveness of innovative water and soil management technologies in an Ontario context. He manages applied science research projects and develops knowledge transfer tools to overcome barriers to widespread implementation of proven technologies. His most recent work includes guidance on the design, inspection and maintenance of low impact development stormwater infrastructure and soil management best practices. Dean also participates on national standards development committees relating to the design and construction of stormwater infrastructure.

Abstract:

Draining roof run-off to pervious landscaped areas like the lawns and garden beds around our properties is standard practice in most communities.  Yet few studies have been done to quantify the runoff reduction benefit of simple roof downspout disconnection, nor to understand how planting soil depth and organic matter content affects how absorbent urban landscapes are to stormwater.

This webinar presents findings from a three-year field monitoring study comparing the run-off characteristics of simulated lawn test plots receiving roof drainage, located at the Kortright Centre in Vaughan, Ontario.  Outflow from each of the four 20 square metre test plots was measured during both natural and simulated rain events and used to calculate run-off coefficients for each simulated lawn.  Hydrologic models (SWMM5) of each roof and simulated lawn area were developed and calibrated with the field monitoring data and used to predict average annual run-off reduction performance.  Scenario modelling and analysis was performed to examine how varying planting soil depth and impervious (roof) to pervious (lawn) area ratio affects run-off reduction performance. Results are compared to recent research literature.

Based on study findings and other recent research, it is recommended that landscaping best practices and municipal urban design standards in Ontario support restoration of 20 to 30 centimetres of planting soil containing a minimum of 5% organic matter by dry weight to all landscaped areas.  A coefficient suitable for modelling the run-off characteristics of landscapes constructed with these minimum standards is provided to allow stormwater management system designers to incorporate this best practice into their calculations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize how soil management best practices during landscape construction help to create healthier, more absorbent and easier to maintain lawns and gardens.
  • Summarize findings comparing run-off coefficients from lawns constructed according to standard and recommended best practices, and effects of varying planting soil depth and impervious to pervious area ratio on runoff reduction performance.
  • Identify recommended minimum standards for restoring healthy soil in municipal urban design standards and landscape construction specifications and ways incorporate the run-off characteristics of this best practice into the design of stormwater management systems.

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November 12, 2020 Optimizing Your Temporary Sediment Basin

Presenter:
Rich McLaughlin, North Carolina State University

Overview: This webinar will discuss all the design and maintenance factors needed to achieve the maximum sediment retention.

Rich McLaughlin is Professor of Urban Soil and Water Management at North Carolina State University

Abstract:

If you have to install a temporary sediment control basin, you might as well make it work hard for you.

In this session, we will discuss all the design and maintenance factors needed to achieve the maximum sediment retention. These factors include:

  • Geometry (length, width, depth)
  • Inlet and outlet structures
  • Flow control with baffles
  • The potential for chemical flocculation

It is possible to capture well over 90% of the sediment coming into a sediment control basin!

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand each of the factors important to sediment basin function.
  • Learn about research on sediment basin design and apply those findings to optimize function.
  • Learn about current design standards for some US states in relation to optimal design.

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November 19, 2020 Skimmer Basins 101

Presenter:
Jamie McCutchen, Rymar Waterworks Innovations

Overview: This webinar will cover several topics related to skimmer basin design including, standards for determining the volume of sediment storage and technical guidance on how to model skimmers in stormwater modeling software packages.

Jamie McCutchen is Founder and Principal of Rymar Waterworks Innovations, the manufacturer of the Marlee Float skimmer. Jamie has worked in site development, with an emphasis on stormwater management, for more than 25 years. A licensed Professional Engineer, Jamie graduated from Clemson University in 1992. He founded CCAD Engineering in 1999 in order to provide civil engineering and consulting services.

Abstract:

This presentation covers several topics related to skimmer basin design, including:

  • Standards for determining the volume of sediment storage and water storage required for sediment basins, including specific requirements from several U.S and local jurisdictions.
  • Standards for determining surface area required for sediment basins, including specific requirements from several U.S and local jurisdictions.
  • Different jurisdictional standards for minimum and maximum dewatering time.

The presentation will also include technical guidance on how to model skimmers in stormwater modeling software packages such as SedCAD, Hydraflow Hydrographs, and HydroCAD.   We will also discuss how skimmers can be used to meet water quality requirements in permanent basins — and in some cases even to reduce basin size.

Key points from James E. Sprague’s technical paper on “Evaluating Floating Surface Skimmers” emphasize the importance of product-specific testing of skimmer flow rates to provide accurate designs. Examples will be presented to demonstrate how this can impact a sediment basin and the ability to meet regulatory requirements.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the benefits of skimmers in sediment basins, as well the key criteria for design of skimmer basins and selection of an appropriately sized skimmer.
  • Understand the critical importance of considering flow rate rather than skimmer size when selecting a skimmer.
  • Learn how to perform advanced hydrology modeling when including a skimmer in a detention pond for permanent use.

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December 3, 2020 Building Climate Change Resiliency in Intensifying Neighbourhoods

Presenters:
Ron Scheckenberger, Wood Environment & Infrastructure Solutions and Kristina Parker, Town of Oakville

Overview: This webinar will examine the approach used to build a Stormwater Management Master Plan that integrated flood control and stormwater drainage while improving and protecting both groundwater and surface water quality.

Ron Scheckenberger is Principal of Wood Environment & Infrastructure Solutions. He leads the Water Resources department of Wood’s Burlington Infrastructure office. Ron joined Philips Engineering Ltd. (now Wood) in 1983 and became a Director in 1991. He is the lead for Wood’s Eastern Canada Water Sector, and a member of the Water Practice Network for Wood’s global operations. Ron works primarily for the public sector on a wide variety of water resources projects.

Kristina Parker s the Water Resources Engineer for the Town of Oakville. Kristina is responsible for implementing capital projects related to stormwater and other water resources. She manages inventory and assessment studies for the town’s water resources assets, including creeks and shorelines. Kristina also manages studies and capital works related to the mitigation of riverine and urban flood risks. In her spare time, Kristina assists with development application review.

Abstract:

The Town of Oakville’s older neighbourhoods south of the QEW were largely built out through the 1950s to 1970s. Characterized by comparatively large lots with small building footprints, these locations are under increasing pressure to intensify with larger homes and amenity areas. The result is an insidious increase in imperviousness and thus runoff peaks and volumes, which is further exacerbated by climate change. Because the area was planned and designed long before modern stormwater management, there is a lack of quantity and quality control, deficient overland flow routes (sags and low points), and numerous locations with ditches or semi-urban servicing.

In developing its Master Plan for this part of the community, the Town focused on pluvial flood risks, and in doing so, commissioned the preparation of a dual-drainage all pipes (and ditches) model for the community. This modelling effort involved over 50 discrete neighbourhoods (networks), more than 3000 catchments, over 260 km of storm sewers, and 168 km of ditches with a drainage area of nearly 40 square km. The prevailing system performance was evaluated using existing rainfall IDF relationships and considered level-of-service objectives for the minor system (storm sewers/ditches) and major system (overland routes/roadways/remnant channels).

Flood risk was assessed based on those locations in the community with directly connected foundation drains to storm sewers, versus those with sump pumps. The system was then assessed with future intensified land use and future climate-adjusted IDF relationships.

Green infrastructure and low impact development solutions were considered for redeveloping private land and reconstructed roadways. Strategic application of 20-25 mm of runoff control would mitigate impacts due to land use and climate change for the minor system. Grey infrastructure solutions (pipe upgrades, storage, diversions, roadway retrofitting, ICDs, etc.) were then able to be confidently planned for a stable future condition.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how older, more mature locations, planned and designed before contemporary SWM, are often under pressure to intensify and therefore are most vulnerable to flood risks, particularly with climate change impacts to runoff potential.
  • Learn how detailed dual-drainage (major-minor) network modelling (all pipes/all ditches) can inform municipalities on current system performance and overall level-of-service, and how varying service conditions (ditched vs. sewer) and risk conditions (basement connections or not) need to be considered in prioritizing works.
  • Recognize that strategic use of green infrastructure and low impact development practices (public and private realm), along with conventional grey infrastructure, can optimize the performance of drainage systems, based on future intensified land use and climate conditions.

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December 10, 2020 Climate Change: Current and Future Impacts on Erosive Rainfall in Calgary, Alberta

Presenter:
Ben Ethier, City of Calgary

Overview: This webinar will highlight research conducted that explores how local erosive rainfall (R-values) in the City of Calgary has changed in the past 20 years, increasing by 2.14 times.

Ben Ethier is an Erosion Control Technician at the City of Calgary. He has recently completed a Master of Science degree at Royal Roads University in Victoria, B.C. Ben is an environmental professional with wide ranging-experience, from environmental consulting in oil and gas to residential land development. He is excited to continue to share a new-found interest in climate change and its potential impacts with a wide variety of groups across Canada.

Abstract:

For the past 15 years, erosive rainfall (R-Value) was assumed to be a constant and has been used, unchanged, by the City of Calgary and consultants as an integral part of construction site soil erosion modeling and approvals. But what if erosive rainfall is not constant? Has climate change impacted erosive rainfall in Calgary? And if so, has a change in erosive rainfall impacted sediment loss rates from construction sites over the past 15 years? Research conducted as part of a Master of Science thesis explores how local R-values in the City of Calgary have changed in the past 20 years, increasing by 2.14 times. This underestimation of R-values has the potential to cause a quantifiable, estimated impact on sediment loading to municipal storm ponds and the Bow River. Future climate change scenarios show that this trend is expected to continue over the next 100 years, impacting the way ESC measures are proposed and implemented on sites.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how the R-value used by the City of Calgary and published by Agriculture-Agrifood Canada is no longer accurate for the specific location studied in the City of Calgary.
  • Understand why the R-value for the City of Calgary is expected to increases due to climate change over the next 100 years.
  • Learn how the reliance on an outdated R-value could have quantifiable, estimated impacts on local infrastructure and watersheds, and how this impact is expected to continue into the future based on climate change predictions.

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December 17, 2020 Dual-Benefit, Unique Approach for Lake Protection: Harvesting Stormwater Restores Shields Lake

Presenters:
Olivia Sparrow and Jay Michels, Emmons & Olivier Resources Inc.

Overview: This webinar will address internal phosphorus loading from lake sediments with an alum treatment to flip the shallow lake from a turbid to a clear water state.

Olivia Sparrow is Director of Canada Operations with Emmons & Olivier Resources Inc. Olivia specializes in water resources modeling, stormwater BMP design, stormwater management planning, and BMP monitoring. Her work has included projects such as the cost-benefit analysis of more than 85,000 urban low impact development retrofit opportunities in Edmonton. Olivia strives to mitigate the detrimental impacts of land development on water resources, natural resources, and human and wildlife communities through her work and research.

Jay Michels, CPESC, is Erosion & Sediment Control Specialist with Emmons & Olivier Resources Inc. Jay has more than 35 years of experience in construction management, erosion control, and stormwater management. The emphasis of his work is in low impact development (LID) and stormwater pollution prevention. His experience in planning, design, and construction management includes projects ranging from residential and commercial development to shoreline and streambank stabilization, and from highway and golf course construction to prairie and wetland restoration.

Abstract:

Stormwater harvesting and use/reuse is a fast-emerging management technique. In water-rich areas, application is being driven by runoff volume control targets (e.g. for stream baseflow augmentation). and the increased infiltration and evapotranspiration losses offer substantial pollutant load reductions. These benefits are offered even at sites with clay soils where it might otherwise be considered impossible to achieve volume control objectives. The Shields Lake stormwater harvesting and irrigation reuse system, constructed in 2018, captures stormwater from 294 acres (119 ha) of agricultural and golf course lands that cover more than a third of the lake’s watershed. Stormwater is captured and stored in a pond that feeds into the golf course irrigation system via a 1,300 foot (400 m) pipe and pump system. The system supplies up to 26 million gallons of water per year for irrigation, and captures 77 pounds (35 kg) of phosphorus annually. The system has achieved the final nutrient load reduction from the watershed called for in assimilative capacity studies. Internal phosphorus loading from lake sediments will be addressed with an alum treatment to flip the shallow lake from a turbid to a clear water state.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the unique capabilities of rainwater harvesting as a stormwater management practice even on sites with clay soils.
  • Learn how rainwater harvesting systems are designed.
  • Learn how design assumptions compare with post-construction monitoring data.

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